Prairie Wildfire
 

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Prairie Wildfire’s music blends the traditions of bluegrass with the free spirit of the still-wild West. All three Wyoming girls have spent their childhoods in a little town nestled in the foothills of the Big Horn Mountains. Their paths were bound to cross–and those crossroads were full of bluegrass. The girls shared a great string teacher, Lynn Young, who invited them to the Thursday Night Jam. They’ve picked with some of the best (Lorraine Jordan, Greg Blake, Dale Ann Bradley), at their musical home, that same Thursday Night Jam at the famous Occidental Saloon where their teacher Lynn introduced them to another mentor, acclaimed songwriter David Stewart. The girls now play, sing, and write songs as individual artists, with Prairie Wildfire, and with David Stewart as part of his Wyoming Wind band.

Morgan Blaney handles the upright bass for the band, blending rock-solid rhythms with both bluegrass and jazz influences. She loves singing leads on old classics, belting them out with her honey-toned voice. She loves to back up Sage and Tessa’s vocals with her up-on-your-tippy-toes high harmony. When she isn’t plucking the bass in the Occidental Saloon, she loves to hole up at the family cabin in the Big Horn mountains. A junior in college, she’s the first double major in bluegrass and jazz upright bass at University of Northern Colorado, Greeley.

Tessa Taylor frails that banjo with high energy and a sense of fun. She frequently plays rhythm guitar for the band when they are out on the road. Her unique vocal style reflects the hard-driving, high lonesome sounds of Wyoming cowboy country.  She sings low harmonies with just a touch of that bluegrass twang. She’s a ranch girl who loves horses and hiking. And she can find an old-time jam to join almost anywhere. Tessa will graduate high school this spring.

Sage Palser fell in love with mandolin as a kid and has been singing and picking ever since. Sage’s rich, full vocals resonate with tenderness and intensity. When she’s not singing lead, she pulls out the middle range harmonies that are part of the Prairie Wildfire “brand.” When she’s not performing, you can find her swing dancing to great country bands. She loves the mountains, the family ranch in Ten Sleep, and her horse Sweetie. This fall, she began her college career at East Tennessee State’s in their Bluegrass Old Time and Roots Music Studies.